Antiphospholipid Syndrome

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder that results in the patient being in a hypercoagulable state due to the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies or Lupus Anticoagulant (LAC) antibodies. For the diagnosis of APS to be confirmed the patient must have one clinical and one laboratory finding as outlined in the updated Sydney guidelines.1

 

Clinical criteria include arterial, venous, or small vessel thrombosis in any tissue or organ and/or infertility due to pregnancy loss or premature births. Laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of APS include the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies or Lupus Anticoagulant (LAC) antibodies. 1

 

Even with the expanded Sydney criteria, diagnosis of APS remains difficult.2 Accurate detection and identification of antiphospholipid antibodies are critical first steps in establishing the proper diagnosis and treatment for patients with a history of thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity. The Immuno Concepts RELISA® family of products helps you in those vital first steps.

 

Bibliography

1. Lim W, Crowther MA, Eikelboom JW. Management of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a systematic review. JAMA. Mar 1 2006;295(9):1050-1057.

2. Devreese K, Hoylaerts MF. Challenges in the diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome. Clin Chem. Jun 2010;56(6):930-940.